Twin Imaginings

As well as remembering things differently, siblings often fight over ownership of the same memory writes the Guardian’s Charles Fernyhough in an article about shared memories and the problems they cause. “A study by Mercedes Sheen and her colleagues from the University of Canterbury asked 20 pairs of twins independently to produce autobiographical memories in response to cue words. Fourteen of the pairs produced at least one memory that was claimed by both twins. A separate study showed that these disputed memories tended to be rated as more vivid and emotionally rich than the agreed-upon ones, possibly because of the imaginative effort that had gone into creating them.”


Tags: Autobiographical Memories  Charles Fernyhough  Guardian (The)  Mercedes Sheen  Study  twins  University of Canterbury  

Inside New Zealand’s Clean Green Beauty Scene

Inside New Zealand’s Clean Green Beauty Scene

Kaeā, founded by conservationist Suzan Craig, is one of a handful of sustainable skincare brands to come out of New Zealand in recent years. Financial Times contribution editor Jessica Beresford interviews…