Silence on Sunderland

“In days gone by, sleepy Clyde really made some noise, writes Caroline Gladstone for The Age. “Tuesday morning, 7 o’clock and the streets are pretty quiet. You could fire the proverbial cannon down Sunderland Street, which stretches from the Clyde Dam at the western end of town to the eastern border a kilometre away, and not hit a soul. Not so 150 years ago when the place was alive with thousands of rambunctious miners making merry every night in the 105 canvas pubs that lined the main street of this former gold rush town.” Gladstone stayed in Clyde at the recently opened “fashionable” Olivers Lodge, a former general store built by merchant Benjamin Naylor in 1869.


Tags: Age (The)  Clyde  Otago  

Auckland Creatives Give Condé Nast a City Tour

Auckland Creatives Give Condé Nast a City Tour

Auckland-based designer Lillie Toogood and husband Dirk Paetzold are helping shape the story of New Zealand now for an international audience. The pair were recently interviewed by Condé Nast Traveler for…