Lye’s primitive symptoms

Animation film Tuslava (1929), created by Christchurch-born artist Len Lye, is part of a an exhibition entitled ‘Animism’ on from 26 April through 28 July at Berlin’s Haus der Kulturen der Welt. The exhibition examines the delineation between life and non-life on the basis of aesthetic symptoms. “This backdrop is the discourse of animism: a term defined by nineteenth century anthropologists searching for mankind’s alleged primitive, original religion, which they identified as the erroneous animation of the surrounding world,” New York-based art networking site e-flux explains. Tusalava consists of thousands of individual drawings, evinces the influence of Australian Aboriginal art and may be considered a “primitivist” work of sorts. Lye’s sculptures are found in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Berkeley Art Museum. He died in New York in 1980.


Tags: Aboriginal Art  Animism  E-Flux  Len Lye  Tuslava  

Ruined Christchurch Houses Released with Light

Ruined Christchurch Houses Released with Light

“For centuries, crosses and circles have been used to mark houses either visited by disease or targeted for burglary. This act of externalising the interior life of a home is something…