On From London to Rio

Despite pushing his body to breaking point for years five-times world rowing champion Mahe Drysdale cannot resist the lure of an Olympic gold medal. While Drysdale looks forward to the day he can eschew early morning starts sculling up and down Lake Karapiro and skip hours of road work on the bike, Drysdale’s pursuit of gold may not end in London. He might decide to “thrash” himself for four more years and compete in Rio in 2016, when he will be 37, he said. Despite the physical toll rowing takes on the body, Drysdale said he was coming into his prime at 33. “I just have to get through this year and see how it goes and then decide if I still have the passion.”


Tags: Christian Science Monitor  London Olympics (2012)  Mahe Drysdale  Rowing  The Olympics  

Looking Back at a Squash Legacy With Susan Devoy

Looking Back at a Squash Legacy With Susan Devoy

In recognition of Rotorua-born squash player Susan Devoy’s exalted status PSA website caught up with the sport’s only ‘Dame’, who ranks only behind the great Heather McKay and Malaysian legend Nicol David…