What They’re Reading

Katherine Mansfield’s 1918 story Je Ne Parles Pas Français is included in the New Yorker’s ‘What We’re Reading’ column, a selection of notes from the staff on their literary engagements of the week. Andrew Mantz writes: “In Je Ne Parles Pas Français, which was written five years before Hemingway published a word, a headstrong bohemian in a Paris café works out his relationship to masculinity. The story employs a host of postmodern pyrotechnics — abrupt shifts in point of view, tricky time dilation, snippets of imagined dialogue between author and reader —sixteen years before Tropic of Cancer, and three decades before For Esme — with Love and Squalor.” Mansfield was born in Wellington in 1888. She died in France of tuberculosis in 1923.


Tags: Andrew Mantz  For Esme — with Love and Squalor  France  Hemingway  Je Ne Parles Pas Français  Katherine Mansfield  New Yorker  Tropic of Cancer  Tuberculosis  Wellington  

Berlin-Based Poet Hinemoana Baker on Connections

Berlin-Based Poet Hinemoana Baker on Connections

Ahead of her recent reading at Internationales Literaturfestival Berlin (ILB), mould-breaking poet Hinemoana Baker talked English-language magazine Exberliner through her new book, the New Zealand-Berlin connection and why Germans should stop…