What They’re Reading

Katherine Mansfield’s 1918 story Je Ne Parles Pas Français is included in the New Yorker’s ‘What We’re Reading’ column, a selection of notes from the staff on their literary engagements of the week. Andrew Mantz writes: “In Je Ne Parles Pas Français, which was written five years before Hemingway published a word, a headstrong bohemian in a Paris café works out his relationship to masculinity. The story employs a host of postmodern pyrotechnics — abrupt shifts in point of view, tricky time dilation, snippets of imagined dialogue between author and reader —sixteen years before Tropic of Cancer, and three decades before For Esme — with Love and Squalor.” Mansfield was born in Wellington in 1888. She died in France of tuberculosis in 1923.


Tags: Andrew Mantz  For Esme — with Love and Squalor  France  Hemingway  Je Ne Parles Pas Français  Katherine Mansfield  New Yorker  Tropic of Cancer  Tuberculosis  Wellington  

Artist Gill Gatfield Smashes the Glass Ceiling

Artist Gill Gatfield Smashes the Glass Ceiling

New Zealand artist Gill Gatfield is profiled in the latest World Sculpture News magazine, with particular focus on her latest work created in glass, which was exhibited in February this year…