Rat-tracker

Groundbreaking research into the origins of Polynesian people by Auckland University’s Lisa Matisoo-Smith has been published in the New York TimesNational Geographic, and Proceedings of the National Academy of  Sciences. Matisoo-Smith used the DNA of Pacific rats – both fossilised and contemporary – to create an extensive family tree mapping the migration paths of various Pacific peoples. Her findings appear to refute the popular “express train” theory – whereby Remote Oceania was settled in a matter of a few centuries – suggesting instead a slower and more interactive process. “The settlement of [the Pacific] was the last major human migration, and it seems to grab the public’s imagination,” says Matisoo-Smith. “But there are not simple answers. Like most human endeavors, the settlement of the Pacific was complex. And that complexity should be recognized and celebrated.”


Tags: Lisa Matisoo-Smith  National Geographic  New York Times (The)  Pacific rats  Polynesian  Remote Oceania  roceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  University of Auckland  

New NAB Chief Ross McEwan Faced With More Repairs

New NAB Chief Ross McEwan Faced With More Repairs

Sitting in the Royal Bank of Scotland’s revamped offices near London’s Liverpool Street station last month – days after accepting the top job at National Australia Bank, having given 12 months’…