Loft vision

NZ-born architect David Howell’s vision for a disused Manhattan loft space earned a full-page feature in the New York Times. Located near Gramercy Park, the 35-by-20-foot rectangular space with 11-foot high ceilings dates from around 1900 and is currently being listed for US $775,000. Howell’s redesign for Halstead Property turns what “had been a bland, predictable arrangement … on its head”, using epoxied concrete flooring and a continuous roll of dark-stained oak planks starting at the windows and covering the walls and floor, creating a shuttered effect. “To insert a continuous object is smoother and sleeker than to break the space up into pieces,” he explains. David Howell first travelled to the US in 1992 on a Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council Grant. He now oversees a staff of 14 at his office on Union Square.


Tags: David Howell  Halstead Property  Manhattan  New York Times (The)  Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council Grant  

Graeme James Revives Lost Art of Shipwreck Song

Graeme James Revives Lost Art of Shipwreck Song

“It’s been a while since” anything like “a gripping seafaring-disaster song” has “come along, but to that list we can now add ‘The Voyage of the James Caird’ by New Zealand…