Creators and Destroyers

The history and breathtaking landscape of New Zealand’s first national park, Tongariro (which dominates the middle of the North Island) is subject to an in-depth analysis by travel writer Mel White and photographer Stuart Franklin, in the July issue of National Geographic. White is mesmerised by the three peaks that dominate the landscape – Ruapehu, Tongariro and Ngauruhoe – and in particular the conical beauty of Ngauruhoe: “The mountain lacks only a few streaks of vivid red crayon above it to be every child’s drawing of the archetypal volcano,” she writes. But co-existing with  Tongariro’s beauty are serious conservation and cultural issues. “Bird-eating stoats, parking-lot construction, profound spiritual and cultural values – all these issues crowd the desks of DOC managers. And one more: Theoretically at least, the park could blow itself to smithereens at any moment.” Stuart Franklin’s photographs complement White’s words,  capturing the intense beauty of the region that has been named a World Heritage site twice, both for its physical features and, later, for its cultural importance.


Tags: National Geographic  Ngauruhoe  Ruapehu  Tongariro  Tongariro National Park  

Waiheke Evokes Fond Memories for Emilia Wickstead

Waiheke Evokes Fond Memories for Emilia Wickstead

New Zealand’s most famous fashion export, the Duchess of Cambridge’s go-to designer Emilia Wickstead tells The Telegraph how this “relaxed and beautiful part of the world” evokes happy childhood memories. “There is…