Baronial City Still Impressive

“A plan for [Dunedin] was laid out on paper in Scotland and given the old Gaelic name for Edinburgh, Dun Eideann,” The Independent’s Adrian Mourby explains. “There were high hopes of this port settlement, tucked away for safety inside the sea-washed crater of an extinct volcano. At first life was hard, but then came the Gold Rush of the 1860s. Rich seams in the Otago Peninsula made Dunedin’s fortune. Even today, Dunedin impresses. The railway station by Sir George Troup was built without a budget. The Edinburgh architect was just told to build the best, so he shipped in granite columns, Royal Doulton tiles and Italian mosaic. It’s not surprising the local tourist board claims this is New Zealand’s most photographed building.”


Tags: Dunedin  Edinburgh  Independent (The)  Otago Peninsula  Scotland  

The New York Times Sends the World to Northland

The New York Times Sends the World to Northland

In Northland, “cultural lessons await, as do hot springs where visitors can recharge body and soul,” according to Daniel Scheffler writing for The New York Times. The region is included in…