Henry’s Heyday

A 111-year-old tuatara named Henry has successfully sewn his seed after over fifteen years in solitary confinement. Henry, who lives at the Southland Museum and Art Gallery, was assumed over the hill and kept alone for many years after becoming aggressive towards other tuataras. In 2002 a tumor near his genitals was removed, and Henry’s mood drastically improved. Recent playtime with fellow reptiles has proven remarkably successful, as mate Mildred hatched 11 little ones last March. “I went off the idea he was good for breeding,” said Lindsay Hazley, the gallery curator, but after the surgery “he was no longer aggressive.” Good news all around, as the endangered tuatara is one of earth’s oldest creatures, dating back 225 million years, having descended independently from reptiles alongside dinosaurs. With only 50,000 tuataras left, all in New Zealand, Henry has his work cut out for him. Tuatara’s live for up to 250 years, and Henry is expected to spend some quality time with museum-mate Lucy in April.


Tags: Daily Mail  Southland Museum and Art Gallery  Tuatara  

Helen Clark Lays Out Her Reasons for Legalising It

Helen Clark Lays Out Her Reasons for Legalising It

In an opinion piece for the UK’s Guardian newspaper, former prime minister and member of the Global Commission on Drug Policy Helen Clark explains why a ‘yes’ in next year’s referendum…