Division Debate

“There has always been sense in New Zealand and Australia being one country,” writes the Anthony Mason Professor of Law at the University of NSW George Williams in an opinion piece called, ‘A nation girt by sea — and divided by it’. “The chance for them to join together arose at federation in 1901, but the opportunity was missed when the new nation included only the Australian colonies,” Williams continues. “Debate on a New Zealand–Australia merger has been sparked by an opinion poll commissioned by New Zealand television showing some support for the move. Not surprisingly, more Australians than New Zealanders are in favour, with 24 per cent of the New Zealanders and 37 per cent of the Australians polled believing the two nations should join forces. As the recent poll suggests, the greater obstacles lie on the other side of the Tasman. There have always been good arguments to join. Many are economic. We could be stronger together. Though as the recent poll suggests, the greater obstacles lie on the other side of the Tasman. It is one thing for Australians to accept New Zealand as a seventh state, it is another again for New Zealanders to see their nation swallowed up by its larger neighbour.”


Tags: Anthony Mason  Australia  George Williams  New Zealand  New Zealand-Australia Merger  Sydney Morning Herald (The)  University of NSW