Moa, Moa and More Moa

New scientific evidence reveals that humans may not be entirely responsible for the extinction of the moa. According to research undertaken in NZ and the US, there were 3 to 12 million moa roaming the forests thousands of years before the arrival of humans, by which time the estimated moa population had dropped to a mere 159,000. This suggests that moa were already in serious decline due to an earlier and equally dramatic biological or environmental event. “We were really surprised because we had been very conservative with all the parameters we used,” said study Director Neil Gemmell of Canterbury University. “It suggests that moa were very common indeed.”


Tags: extinction  moa  native birds  Neil Gemmell  New Scientist  New Zealand  University of Canterbury  

Helen Clark Lays Out Her Reasons for Legalising It

Helen Clark Lays Out Her Reasons for Legalising It

In an opinion piece for the UK’s Guardian newspaper, former prime minister and member of the Global Commission on Drug Policy Helen Clark explains why a ‘yes’ in next year’s referendum…