Art of Living with Significant Spatial Drama

New Zealand-born painter Stefan Dunlop’s treetop Noosa home is one of a number of artists’ houses throughout the world with “significant spatial drama”, according to a Telegraph article. Dunlop is an individual “with an aesthetic sensibility … affect[ing] [his] living environment in a positive way.”

Dunlop was living in a London loft when he found a plot of land occupying a privileged perch at Noosa, northeastern Australia. Handily, his new next-door neighbours turned out to be members of the architecture practice Bark Design, and together they devised a home that sucks in the extraordinary Pacific views and Antipodean light. The main house is sheathed in batten screens of spotted gum wood, and Dunlop also has a detached studio clad in corrugated tin.”

In 2007, Vogue Living featured the Dunlop home. “The house is perched on a steep south-eastern-facing slope. Plenty of height in the undercroft allows for Dunlop’s large paintings to be brought out of the skillion-roofed studio that abuts the home’s verandah.

“The house celebrates its tough environment and creates a striking shell for the furniture and artwork within, while the separate studio acts as a hideaway where Dunlop can, in his own words, ‘go for the jugular’.”

Original article by Matt Gibberd & Albert Hill, The Telegraph, May 15, 2014.

Photo by Richard Powers.


Tags: Noosa  Stefan Dunlop  Telegraph (The)  Vogue Living  

Meet the Feebles Inspires Happytime Murders Writer

Meet the Feebles Inspires Happytime Murders Writer

Danny Mulheron, Meet the Feebles writer, and American scriptwriter Todd Berger – for the R-rated puppet comedy, The Happytime Murders – recount almost 30 years of bad taste for an article…